Loading
 
 
 
Loading
 
Runaway slave-turned-priest moves closer to beatification
Loading
 
May 14, 2018 / 0 Commentaries
 
Imprimir
 
 

Chicago, Illinois, USA (Monday, May 14, 2018, Gaudium Press) The first African American priest in the U.S. could become the country's first African American saint as his cause took another step forward this week.

A document summarizing the life, virtue, and alleged miracles of Servant of God Fr. Augustus Tolton, known as the positio, was unanimously approved as historically correct by a committee of six Vatican officials this week, clearing the way for the priest's cause for canonization to continue moving forward.

Fr_Tolton_Credit_Simmons_William_J_Public_Domain_CNA.jpg

Bishop Joseph N. Perry, auxiliary bishop of Chicago and diocesan postulator for the Tolton cause, called the approval a "very positive sign going forward" and noted its significance for the African American Catholic Community.

"Fr. Tolton lived during a particularly tumultuous time in American history especially for race relations," Perry said in a statement.

"He was a pioneer of his era for inclusiveness drawing both blacks and whites to his parish in Quincy. However, due to his race, he suffered discrimination and condemnation. The beatification and canonization of Fr. Tolton will signal a significant milestone in the history of black Catholicism in the United States."
Born in Missouri on April 1, 1854, John Augustine Tolton fled slavery with his mother and two siblings in 1862 by crossing the Mississippi River into Illinois.

"John, boy, you're free. Never forget the goodness of the Lord," Tolton's mother told him after the crossing, according to the website of St. Elizabeth's Church in Chicago.

The young Tolton entered St. Peter's Catholic School with the help of the school's pastor, Fr. Peter McGirr. Fr. McGirr would later baptize him and instruct him for his first Holy Communion. Tolton was serving as an altar boy by the next summer.

The priest asked Tolton if he would like to become a priest, saying it would take 12 years of hard study. The excited boy then said they should go to church and pray for his success.

After graduating from high school and Quincy College, he began his ecclesiastical studies in Rome, because no American seminary would accept him on account of his race.

On April 24, 1886 he was ordained in Rome by Cardinal Lucido Maria Parocchi, who was then the vicar general of Rome. Newspapers throughout the U.S. carried the story.

Fr. Tolton was ordained for the southern Illinois Diocese of Quincy. Upon his return in July 1886, he was greeted at the train station "like a conquering hero," the website of St. Elizabeth's Parish says.

"Thousands were there to greet him, led by Father McGirr. A brass band played church songs and Negro Spirituals. Thousands of blacks and whites lined the streets to catch a glimpse of the new priest wearing a black Prince Albert and a silk hat. People marched and cheered his flower-draped four-horse carriage. Children, priests and sisters left the school joining the procession heading towards the church."

Hundreds waited at the local church where people of all races knelt at the communion rail.

Fr. Tolton served in Quincy before going to Chicago to start a parish for black Catholics. The new church was named for St. Monica and opened in 1893.
On July 9, 1897, Fr. Tolton collapsed during a hot day and died from sunstroke at the age of 43.

His cause for canonization was officially launched in 2010, and he was given the title "Servant of God" by the Vatican in February 2011. The research phase of his cause concluded on September 29, 2014.

The next step in his cause for canonization will be in February 2019, when a theological commission with the Congregation for Causes of Saints will further investigate his life and virtue, and consider granting him the title of "Venerable," which must receive papal approval.

After that step, Tolton's cause would move forward toward beatification, for which a miracle through his intercession must be approved.

Source CNA

 

Loading
Runaway slave-turned-priest moves closer to beatification

Chicago, Illinois, USA (Monday, May 14, 2018, Gaudium Press) The first African American priest in the U.S. could become the country's first African American saint as his cause took another step forward this week.

A document summarizing the life, virtue, and alleged miracles of Servant of God Fr. Augustus Tolton, known as the positio, was unanimously approved as historically correct by a committee of six Vatican officials this week, clearing the way for the priest's cause for canonization to continue moving forward.

Fr_Tolton_Credit_Simmons_William_J_Public_Domain_CNA.jpg

Bishop Joseph N. Perry, auxiliary bishop of Chicago and diocesan postulator for the Tolton cause, called the approval a "very positive sign going forward" and noted its significance for the African American Catholic Community.

"Fr. Tolton lived during a particularly tumultuous time in American history especially for race relations," Perry said in a statement.

"He was a pioneer of his era for inclusiveness drawing both blacks and whites to his parish in Quincy. However, due to his race, he suffered discrimination and condemnation. The beatification and canonization of Fr. Tolton will signal a significant milestone in the history of black Catholicism in the United States."
Born in Missouri on April 1, 1854, John Augustine Tolton fled slavery with his mother and two siblings in 1862 by crossing the Mississippi River into Illinois.

"John, boy, you're free. Never forget the goodness of the Lord," Tolton's mother told him after the crossing, according to the website of St. Elizabeth's Church in Chicago.

The young Tolton entered St. Peter's Catholic School with the help of the school's pastor, Fr. Peter McGirr. Fr. McGirr would later baptize him and instruct him for his first Holy Communion. Tolton was serving as an altar boy by the next summer.

The priest asked Tolton if he would like to become a priest, saying it would take 12 years of hard study. The excited boy then said they should go to church and pray for his success.

After graduating from high school and Quincy College, he began his ecclesiastical studies in Rome, because no American seminary would accept him on account of his race.

On April 24, 1886 he was ordained in Rome by Cardinal Lucido Maria Parocchi, who was then the vicar general of Rome. Newspapers throughout the U.S. carried the story.

Fr. Tolton was ordained for the southern Illinois Diocese of Quincy. Upon his return in July 1886, he was greeted at the train station "like a conquering hero," the website of St. Elizabeth's Parish says.

"Thousands were there to greet him, led by Father McGirr. A brass band played church songs and Negro Spirituals. Thousands of blacks and whites lined the streets to catch a glimpse of the new priest wearing a black Prince Albert and a silk hat. People marched and cheered his flower-draped four-horse carriage. Children, priests and sisters left the school joining the procession heading towards the church."

Hundreds waited at the local church where people of all races knelt at the communion rail.

Fr. Tolton served in Quincy before going to Chicago to start a parish for black Catholics. The new church was named for St. Monica and opened in 1893.
On July 9, 1897, Fr. Tolton collapsed during a hot day and died from sunstroke at the age of 43.

His cause for canonization was officially launched in 2010, and he was given the title "Servant of God" by the Vatican in February 2011. The research phase of his cause concluded on September 29, 2014.

The next step in his cause for canonization will be in February 2019, when a theological commission with the Congregation for Causes of Saints will further investigate his life and virtue, and consider granting him the title of "Venerable," which must receive papal approval.

After that step, Tolton's cause would move forward toward beatification, for which a miracle through his intercession must be approved.

Source CNA

 

Content published in en.gaudiumpress.org, in the link http://en.gaudiumpress.org/content/95189-Runaway-slave-turned-priest-moves-closer-to-beatification. All our articles can be used, provided that the source is named.



 

Leave a comment
Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *



 
» Ads
PublicidadGaudiumPressEnHomeRight
      Last News


Crowned a holy life with a holy death… ...
 
By receiving the Eucharist at Mass, Christians are given Christ’s same spirit and a taste of etern ...
 
The Cardinal was heavily criticised in the Pennsylvania grand jury report… ...
 
“If one member suffers, all suffer together with it…” ...
 
Last week, the Turkish lira lost 20% of its value against the US Dollar… ...
 
Loading


What is being twitted about

Loading


 
 

Loading

Loading